Music and Spiritual Journey

In this Video Amir Koushkani talks about the meaning of sound, Fjallraven Kanken No.2 nike air max 2016 wit Nike Trainers UK soldes adidas pas cher Goedkope Nike Air Max 1 chaussure Asics Gel-Lyte III fjallraven kanken ray ban pas cher the relation of music player and his instrument and how performing music can teach us to be in the...
The Persian Tār

The Persian Tār

Historically speaking, the tār is derived from three other older instruments namely: barbat (ancient Persian lute), robāb (lute-like plucked instrument), and a member of the long-necked lute family, called tanbur (Vohdāni 1998, 21). The tār’s double sound boxes, or kāseh and naqāreh,1* which are hollowed from mulberry wood, are analogous to a figure 8 or two hearts, heterogeneous in size, that are attached together from their apexes (Caron and Safvat 2010, 205). The soundboard, or poost, is a thin membrane of lambskin that is stretched over the top face of both kāseh and naqāreh. The neck (dasteh) or fingerboard, which is attached from one end to the naqāreh and from the other end to the peg box or sar-panjeh, is made from walnut wood. Its top flat face, where the fingers touch the strings, is ornamented with two strips of camel’s bone equidistantly located from the central wooden section. The surface of the neck (dasteh) is enfolded by twenty-eight moveable gut2* frets, or pardeh. The peg box, or sar-panjeh, is also made from walnut wood, and it encompasses six tuning pegs, or gushi-hā, three on either side (Atrāi and Darvishi 2010, 15-20). Considering the strings, the tar is comprised of three courses or sets of two-strings (double strings). The first set is called sim-ha-ye-sefid or hād, as they used to be called in ancient times. These two string-sets, which are made from identical material and tuned in unison, are located below the other two double strings. The second set of strings, which also consists of the same two strings tuned in unison, is called sim-ha-ye-zard or, historically speaking, zir. They are...