Live Performance in Canada

In this video we see a live performance at CBC’s Studio 40, that took place in March 2011 and featured the members of the trio Safa: Sal Ferreras, Francois Houle, Amir Koushkani, Celso Machado, Laurence Mollerup and Cameron Wilson.

Music and Spiritual Journey

In this Video Amir Koushkani talks about the meaning of sound, Fjallraven Kanken No.2 nike air max 2016 wit Nike Trainers UK soldes adidas pas cher Goedkope Nike Air Max 1 chaussure Asics Gel-Lyte III fjallraven kanken ray ban pas cher the relation of music player and his instrument and how performing music can teach us to be in the...
RADIF – Part one

RADIF – Part one

The author contends that radif is a large collection of elastic and flexible melodies that were meticulously preserved and organized orally by the aforementioned master-musicians over the last two centuries. This collection carries all the different existing scales and motivic gestures in Persian music and includes highly complex transitional melodies bringing all the smaller pieces (gushehs) together and presenting a larger form of musical assembly known as dastgah. In the author’s opinion, radif is the art of combining musical materials within an ordered framework of uniformity and interdependence. The structure of radif is occasionally variant, depending on the user’s purpose. Radif as a pedagogical system must stay solid and untouched, and the presenters should rigorously observe the narrator’s instructions in materials and techniques. This manner of applying radif can be fulfilled with the help of practice and hard work in order to achieve the same result as the instructor demands. At this level the user is not allowed to make changes in any component of the material and any changes would be considered to be a weakness in techniques. However, this rule is bending when using these materials in actual performance, at which time the performer, benefiting from the profound understanding of all the musical material learned through years of practice and experience, is expected to demonstrate creativity through the medium of improvisation. This might be a suitable response to Nettl’s observation according to which he indicates that, in performing traditional music, performers are divided into two different groups: namely, those who just play radif as is and those who improvise based on radif. Performer and audience alike might...
The Persian Tār

The Persian Tār

Historically speaking, the tār is derived from three other older instruments namely: barbat (ancient Persian lute), robāb (lute-like plucked instrument), and a member of the long-necked lute family, called tanbur (Vohdāni 1998, 21). The tār’s double sound boxes, or kāseh and naqāreh,1* which are hollowed from mulberry wood, are analogous to a figure 8 or two hearts, heterogeneous in size, that are attached together from their apexes (Caron and Safvat 2010, 205). The soundboard, or poost, is a thin membrane of lambskin that is stretched over the top face of both kāseh and naqāreh. The neck (dasteh) or fingerboard, which is attached from one end to the naqāreh and from the other end to the peg box or sar-panjeh, is made from walnut wood. Its top flat face, where the fingers touch the strings, is ornamented with two strips of camel’s bone equidistantly located from the central wooden section. The surface of the neck (dasteh) is enfolded by twenty-eight moveable gut2* frets, or pardeh. The peg box, or sar-panjeh, is also made from walnut wood, and it encompasses six tuning pegs, or gushi-hā, three on either side (Atrāi and Darvishi 2010, 15-20). Considering the strings, the tar is comprised of three courses or sets of two-strings (double strings). The first set is called sim-ha-ye-sefid or hād, as they used to be called in ancient times. These two string-sets, which are made from identical material and tuned in unison, are located below the other two double strings. The second set of strings, which also consists of the same two strings tuned in unison, is called sim-ha-ye-zard or, historically speaking, zir. They are...